There were other indigenous attempts as well and one of the most the successful of them is almost entirely  forgotten today, was actually a warrior Queen called Abbakka, she and her daughter and granddaughter for almost 80 years resisted the Portuguese, from their kingdom, in an outpost called Ullal, which is very very close to Mangalore and this Warrior Queen, she was a queen, of course remember this coast has a very strong matrilineal, and occasionally matriarchal tradition and she using Coastal ships, she used to essentially trap Portuguese ships, occasionally sinking them, capturing them on several occasions defeating the Portuguese, the first queen Abbakka was herself captured and killed but her daughter and then her granddaughter kept up the war.

Now the oral histories of that coast line have lots of stories about Abbakka, in fact there are dance drama and Yakshagana and other performances done in the name of Abbakka, but there are almost no histories written about her, certainly not in English, I believe there are some in Tulu, which is the language off that area, but it is quite shocking that, we Indians do not remember these stories of resistance, we were much rather, actually know a lot about the European side of the story, oddly enough the European themselves do mention occasionally Abbakka. But we very rarely talk about it. So, I think one of the things that I want to do to through this attempt to at least document some part of our maritime histories to bring out some of the stories.