Miscellaneous

The Ancient Indian Port of Lothal

Courtesy: https://twitter.com/bhandarkari/status/1551620726184382474?s=24&t=936r44Pm1Pze6Una0mb7KQ

An incredible 4500-years-old story of human ingenuity, international trade, climate change, calamities, and the world’s earliest known dock. Around 6,000 years ago, a nascent civilization emerged on the banks of the Sindhu and Saraswati rivers. Over the next 2,000 years, it spread around the region – from Harappa, Mohenjo-Daro, and Rakhigadi to today’s western Uttar Pradesh in the West and Dholavira in the south.

The town of Lothal, along with Dholavira, was one of the southern-most points of this civilization.

(There is evidence that Pre-Harappan cultures occupied the region, and around 2,700-2,400 years ago, they amalgamated into the prosperous Harappan civilization.)

The town of Lothal, along with Dholavira, was one of the southern-most points of this civilization.

(There is evidence that Pre-Harappan cultures occupied the region, and around 2,700-2,400 years ago, they amalgamated into the prosperous Harappan civilization.)

The Indian Ocean was perhaps the ocean to be explored for trade purposes. The thousands of miles of the sea were the bridge that connected Indian, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, and Sumerian cultures. Lothal exported beautiful beads from the Narmada valley, cotton, timber, and ivory in return for baser metals, wool, and cosmetics. Between 2,450 BCE to 2,350 BCE, it was a small dock that could house small boats.

However, the small trading town of Lothal had a natural nemesis: floods. Every few years or floods would ravage the village. The flood of 2,350 BCE was particularly brutal, and it leveled the town completely.

The people of Lothal but saw an opportunity in the calamity. While planning the new town, or rather the new city, they added an artificial dock for berthing larger ships, and in a greater number, than was hitherto possible.

The people of Lothal but saw an opportunity in the calamity. The engineers built the dock away from the main water stream but close to the city so that the ships could be safely berthed even during the storms.

In the first instance, a trapezoid basin, 214 × 36 meters, was excavated on the eastern margin of the city and enclosed with massive brick walls. The excavated earth was used for making bricks needed for constructing the wharf, warehouse, and private dwelling.

The structure’s design reveals that all problems relating to dockyard engineering, such as the rate of silting, the velocity of the current, and the thrust of water in the basin, were carefully considered. First-class kiln-fired bricks were used in the construction.

Dr. S. R. Rao (ASI), in his 1964 essay “Shipping in Ancient India,” offers an astonishing comparison of Lothal with modern-day ports of Mumbai and Vishakhapatnam.

This new port transformed Lothal into a booming and prosperous city for almost 350 years.

However, a massive flood in 2,000 BCE caused tremendous damage to the port. Though strategic repairs were made swiftly, a natural shift rendered them void.

As a result of the flood, the river silted its mouth and abruptly changed its course towards the east. It cut off the ships’ access from the Gulf of Cambay to the dock.The citizens did not give up. They dug up a canal, 2 meters deep and 2 KM long to connect the dock to the gulf again. It, however, diminished the viability of larger ships entering the port.

The trade declined as a result. While disasters dealt a sudden blow, a consistent process of climate change, which included weakened Monsoons and resultant land aridity and deforestation, were harbingers of a slow death. The declining city was wiped out of existence by a deluge in 1900 BCE. While people continued to inhabit the region for eons to come, Lothal did not reach its earlier height again.

It is undeniable that at its peak, Lothal was a shining example of the evolving human race and the ingenuity and gumption of the ancient Indian civilization.

The reconstruction of Lothal’s long-lost glory has been a remarkable triumph of the inter-disciplinary field of Archaeology. This process has included the study of marine archaeology, anthropology, ecology and climate, and metallurgy.

These fundamentals of archaeology are covered in our upcoming online course that begins on August 01, 2022.

https://t.co/Psk0S7oWow

Leave a Reply

You may also like

Medieval History Miscellaneous

The legacy of loyalty by the great Mughals 

Courtesy: https://twitter.com/mumukshusavitri/status/1532261065207074817?s=24&t=rsnv1Gu82ULo9uO982zZig

1 The Mughal emperor Humayun blinded his own brother Kamran & murdered his brothers Askari and Hindal.

2 Akbar the “great” killed his own foster brother Adham Khan by throwing him down from the palace walls at Agra, in 1562. Akbar’s murder of Adham Khan was illustrated in the Akbarnama by the Mughal court artists Miskin and Shankar.

Image

3 Jahangir cruelly blinded his own son Khusrau as his father Akbar wanted his grandson as heir, because Jahangir was an alcoholic & drug addict. Khusrau was captured, put on an elephant & paraded down Chandni Chowk, while his kinsmen were held at knife-point on raised platforms.

Image

4 As the elephant approached each platform, each supporter was impaled on a stake (through his bowels), while Khusrau was forced to watch & listen to the screams. This was repeated numerous times, then Khusrau was blinded by his father Jahangir in…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

India-China Conflict: India’s Victory of 1967 and the 2020 Clash #Sangam Talk By Probal DasGupta

post-image

The Indian army veteran and author of Watershed 1967: India’s forgotten victory over China, Probal DasGupta talks of the Indo-China relations, particularly the lesser known incidents of 1967. The present standoff in Ladakh has raised questions of war and has brought up the historic narrative between the two countries. today. For fifty years, the event that dominated our memories was the 1962 India-China war, which India lost. However, the present crisis has focused on India’s victory over China in 1967. Probal’s book Watershed 1967 has played a significant role in reshaping the India-China narrative. In this talk he discusses China’s motives and India’s options today, and how 1967 is relevant in the current India-China skirmishes.

About the Speaker:

Probal DasGupta is an Indian army veteran and author…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

Tibet: How Nehru lost India & Tibet in 1954

post-image

Courtesy: Sheshapatangi1 https://twitter.com/sheshapatangi1/status/1519882907455696899?s=21&t=Xt1Vy_kfGP9wkhdxbMWI8w

On this day in 1954, Nehru Government Officially DENOUNCED TIBET.

Excerpts from Tibet – The Lost Frontier by Claude Arpi.

On May 15, 1954 – Nehru summed up the debate in the parliament by saying “in my opinion, we have done no better thing than this since we became independent. I have no doubt about this… I think it is right for our country, for Asia and for the World”.

It took only few days for India to discover that all problems had not been settled. The first Chinese incursion in the Barahoti area of Uttar Pradesh occurred in June 1954. This was the first of a series of hundreds of incursions which culminated in the attack of October 1962.
In school,…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

Weapons from Punjab and Rajasthan seized in Maharashtra

post-image

While the Hanuman Chalisa and Azaan issue is simmering in Maharashtra huge batches of Swords and other weapons transported from states like Rajasthan and Punjab are being seized in Maharashtra. In last few days three such cases have been registered by Maharashtra police. Isn’t it a clear message that violence is knocking on the door? The rioters being celebrated and awarded in Karnataka and the long list of benefiters from Karauli riots convey the same! Wake up Hindus!

Source: https://www.naidunia.com

Maharashtra के धुले में मिला हथियारों का जखीरा, तलवार और खंजर समेत 90 हथियार जब्त, 4 आरोपी गिरफ्तार। अजान को लेकर राज ठाकरे की होने वाली सभा के लिए, राजस्थान से भेजी जा रही थीं तलवारें।

महाराष्ट्र के धुले जिले से भारी मात्रा में हथियार…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

One more territory lost to the changing Demography! The Uttarakhand!

post-image

Courtesy: https://twitter.com/anshul_aliganj/status/1517047053821825025?s=21&t=m0uR2PDEkJsDWLonYOQqAg

In Uttarakhand the Tourism Industry has been taken over by Samuday Vishesh. After the change in demography this was bound to happen.

Gadhwal was lost already and and now kumaon getting lost. Be it Nainital, Bhimtal, Ramnagar, Bageshwar,Jageshwar,Ranikhet and Kisano every where you will find them.
Locals have leased their hotels and restaurants to them.

Even when they are of not so well off background still they are able to do highest bidding and are able to get the hotels on lease.
Samuday Vishesh People from far off places have come and taken over Uttarakhand Tourism.

They have removed the local waiters , cooks and…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

The Jama Masjid of Ahmedabad on the glorious Bhadra Kali Mandir

post-image

Source:
https://www.booksfact.com/archeology/jama-masjid-ahmedabad-bhadrakali-temple.html

The Jama Masjid in Ahmedabad was originally A Bhadra Kali temple. It was converted into a mosque by Ahmed Shah I. The intricate flowers, coiled serpents representing Kundalini and bells, the remnants of the glorious temple that it may have been. Such carvings are banned in Islam. This goes on to support the history of the temple. Goddess Bhadrakali was believed to be the Nagar Devi of Ahmedabad.

One of Ahmedabad’s ancient names was Bhadra which was after Devi Bhadrakali. Ahmedabad was named after Ahmad Shah I of the Muzaffarid dynasty who forcibly captured “Karnavati” in 1411.

Bhadrakali temple is believed to be one of the oldest temple of Ahmedabad and located inside Bhadra Fort in center of city.The exact date of construction is not known but as per the evidence this holy shrine…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

Facts about Mahmud Ghazni

post-image

Courtesy: Eztainutlacatl

How many of you know that Mahmud’s father was a Kyrghyz Buddhist caught in childhood and converted forcibly? How many know that Mahmud is called Zabuli because he was born out of a forced union between that slave Sabuktegin and a Zabuli Princess?

And how many of you know that Multan sided Mahmud against the Shahis in the name of religion but Mahmud decided Multan was not Muslim enough and attacked it? And how many of you know that of the 17 raids of Mahmud, 14 are against his neighbour, the Shahis?

And how many of you know that Mahmud is not exactly great – he waged an annual jihad against India but in 31 his year rule, only 17 raids are known – what happened to the balance 13? And how…

Read More
Ancient History History Maritime History Medieval History Miscellaneous

Kastur Ba: the secret shadow

post-image

On her 153rd Birth anniversary

Courtesy: Sheshapatangi1

https://twitter.com/sheshapatangi1/status/1513352430250995715?s=21&t=i81i06F0q8_Wv8EeFTvdjg

“I simply cannot bear to look at Ba’s face, the expression is often like that of a meek cow and that in her own dump manner she is saying something” –
MKG

To keep the brand, “Mahatma” popular, they never told the miserable story of his wife.
On her 153rd birth anniversary, let us revisit a tragedy called #KasturbaGandhi.

Born on April 11, 1869 at Porbander, Kasturba was elder to Gandhi by 6 months, she married Mohandas with whom she played since her childhood.

Gandhi’s rejection of Kasturba came to the extent…

Read More
%d bloggers like this: